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Thema: Cloudbleed

  1. #1
    W32.Lovgate Avatar von Notorious
    Registriert seit
    21.01.2010
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    325

    Standard Cloudbleed

    Incident report on memory leak caused by Cloudflare parser bug


    Last Friday, Tavis Ormandy from Google’s Project Zero contacted Cloudflare to report a security problem with our edge servers. He was seeing corrupted web pages being returned by some HTTP requests run through Cloudflare.

    It turned out that in some unusual circumstances, which I’ll detail below, our edge servers were running past the end of a buffer and returning memory that contained private information such as HTTP cookies, authentication tokens, HTTP POST bodies, and other sensitive data. And some of that data had been cached by search engines.
    For the avoidance of doubt, Cloudflare customer SSL private keys were not leaked. Cloudflare has always terminated SSL connections through an isolated instance of NGINX that was not affected by this bug.


    For the avoidance of doubt, Cloudflare customer SSL private keys were not leaked. Cloudflare has always terminated SSL connections through an isolated instance of NGINX that was not affected by this bug.

    We quickly identified the problem and turned off three minor Cloudflare features (email obfuscation, Server-side Excludes and Automatic HTTPS Rewrites) that were all using the same HTML parser chain that was causing the leakage. At that point it was no longer possible for memory to be returned in an HTTP response.

    Because of the seriousness of such a bug, a cross-functional team from software engineering, infosec and operations formed in San Francisco and London to fully understand the underlying cause, to understand the effect of the memory leakage, and to work with Google and other search engines to remove any cached HTTP responses.
    Having a global team meant that, at 12 hour intervals, work was handed over between offices enabling staff to work on the problem 24 hours a day. The team has worked continuously to ensure that this bug and its consequences are fully dealt with. One of the advantages of being a service is that bugs can go from reported to fixed in minutes to hours instead of months. The industry standard time allowed to deploy a fix for a bug like this is usually three months; we were completely finished globally in under 7 hours with an initial mitigation in 47 minutes.


    The bug was serious because the leaked memory could contain private information and because it had been cached by search engines. We have also not discovered any evidence of malicious exploits of the bug or other reports of its existence.


    The greatest period of impact was from February 13 and February 18 with around 1 in every 3,300,000 HTTP requests through Cloudflare potentially resulting in memory leakage (that’s about 0.00003% of requests).


    We are grateful that it was found by one of the world’s top security research teams and reported to us.


    This blog post is rather long but, as is our tradition, we prefer to be open and technically detailed about problems that occur with our service.
    [...]

    Mehr auf: https://blog.cloudflare.com/incident...re-parser-bug/

  2. Folgende Benutzer haben sich für diesen Beitrag bedankt:

    Boehmer (24.02.2017)

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